College of Arts & Sciences Sustainability

Course Offerings

The Sustainability major and minor are highly interdisciplinary.  As such, courses for the Sustainability program are offered from a variety of departments.

Fall 2014 Sustainability Course Offerings

Core Courses
  • SUST 201 – Sustainability and Society
    This course will examine what is meant by the term sustainability and will assess how sustainability can be used as a framework to address complex societal issues including our food systems, social justice, and sustainable development.
  • BIOL 310 – Environmental Science
    A lecture discussion course dealing with human impact on the environment and on the use and misuses of our renewable and non-renewable resources, including air, water, soil and living organisms. Discussion of pertinent literature dealing with humans as a member of an ecological system.
  • SUST 494 – Sustainability Internship
    Applied, monitored, and supervised field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study. A higher level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with field experience courses.
  • SUST 496 – Sustainability Field Experience
    Applied, monitored, and supervised field-based learning experience for which the student may or may not be paid. Students gain practical experience; they follow a negotiated and/or directed plan of study established by the student, instructor, and field-based supervisor. Due to the presence of a field experience supervisor, a lower level of supervision is provided by the instructor in these courses than is the case with an internship or practicum course.
  • SUST 498 – Sustainability Undergraduate Research
    Independent research problems/projects or scholarship activities. The plan of study is negotiated by the faculty member and student. Contact between the two may be extensive and intensive. Does not include research courses which are theoretical.
Social Sciences Specialization
  • ANTH 426 (also SUST 492) – Questioning and Collapse
    Connecting archaeology's study of the past to present day concerns, this course will examine materials and data on successful management practices of the past, including information on lasting agricultural and forestry practices. These insights will not only broaden our sense of what collapse means but also what sustainability can mean.
  • MCOM 243 – Public Relations Principles
    An introduction to the theory and practice of public relations, emphasizing its publics, management function, writing skills, communication processes, tools and professional ethics.
  • POLS 320 – Public Administration
    This course uses simulations and public management cases, as well as contemporary public administration literature, to introduce students to the theory and practice of public administration. Students work in teams to resolve issues and problems common to the public service environment.
  • POLS 421 – Introduction to the Non-profit Sector
    A review of the major literature and fundamental questions related to the theory, history, and rationale for nonprofit organizations; considers also public-private partnership and the blending of nonprofit and governmental sectors.
Natural Sciences Specialization
  • BIOL 311 – Principles of Ecology
    Basic principles of ecology including the sub-disciplines of physiological ecology, population ecology, community ecology, evolutionary ecology, and ecosystems ecology from both a theoretical and applied aspect.
  • CHEM 326 – Organic Chemistry I
    A systematic treatment of the chemistry of carbon compounds, including nomenclature, structure-reactivity relationships, reaction mechanisms, synthesis, and spectroscopy.
  • ESCI/SUST 321 – Earth Resources  
    Comprehensive survey of earth resources including energy, metallic, nonmetallic, soil, and water resources. Consideration of origin of resources, their uses, their global distribution, and environmental issues surrounding their extraction and use.
  • BIOL 492 – Topics: Biodiversity and Ecosystem Function
    This class explores broad trends in biodiversity and cover the methods and patterns that show how that loss of biodiversity affects ecosystems, their functioning, and the services they provide to humans. We will rely on the primary literature to gain an understanding of what biodiversity is, how it's measured, why it's declining, and how researchers have tested its effects on ecosystems. The class is a mix of lectures and student-led discussions.
View our Undergraduate Catalog for complete Course Descriptions.