Year Graduated

Anne CipperleyAnne Cipperley

2009


Matthew TysdalMatthew Tysdal

2011


Brandon Haiar

I completed my undergraduate coursework in 2010 with a Bachelor’s of Science in economics and minors in mathematics and business. Immediately thereafter, I enrolled in the M.B.A. program, which I finished in 2011. Also, during my second year of work as a forecasting analyst for First National Bank of Omaha, I earned a graduate certificate in computational finance.


Favorite Economic Class and Why

Anne Cipperley
My favorite economics class was International Trade taught by Professor David Carr. I really enjoyed how he used real life examples and class discussions to teach the subject matter. Additionally, I found it fascinating how countries often use barriers to prevent trade with other countries that actually end up making goods more expensive for their own people. 

Brandon Haiar
My favorite economics courses were Econometrics and Managerial Economics. Econometrics equipped me with the basic, statistical tools needed to research business and economic questions using analytics. Managerial economics taught me to think strategically and to frame business questions with sound economic theory.

Why Be an Economics Major

Anne Cipperley
I started off as a math major and then I took the first two introductory economics classes because my sister, who was an economics major at the time, thought I might be interested in economics. I knew once I took the second economics class that economics was the perfect field for me. Economics combines history, business, politics and math all in one, which are all areas I was passionate about. In addition, I was able to apply my math skills to real life situations and problem. 

Brandon Haiar
I decided to major in economics because I perceived it to be the science behind all business. Look at almost any Ph.D. program in a business field and you will find a core curriculum that relies upon economics. 

Matthew Tysdal
Professor David Carr inspired me to become an economics major. He really had a way of holding my interest during his lectures in the Principles of Microeconomics course. He made it all sound so interesting that I had to pursue a degree in the field.

What are You Doing Now

Anne Cipperley
I currently work at the State of South Dakota Investment Office as a high yield bond portfolio manager.

Brandon Haiar
I am currently employed as a senior credit risk analyst at First National Bank of Omaha. My job is to turn data into useful information for making business decisions and to communicate my findings. I believe that an economic mindset has proven vital to my career advancement by providing a solid foundation for deriving solutions to business problems.

Matthew Tysdal
I am currently working as a utility analyst for the South Dakota Public Utilities Commission. This position gives me the opportunity to apply economic principles to real world situations while serving the people of South Dakota at the same time. Details of my job include analyzing dockets filed by electric utility companies who want to change their rates and then present my findings to South Dakota's three elected commissioners. With this data the commissioners are able to make an informed vote. My work ensures that natural monopolies do not take advantage of consumers.

How Economics Helped/Prepare

Anne Cipperley
Economics teaches a person how to think outside the box and that is very important for whatever future career a person chooses. For example, in my current job you have to be able to think through how management will run a business and how other owners of high yield bonds will react in certain situations. Economics, specifically Game Theory, taught me how to think through what motivates and incentives these people to make certain decisions so that I can estimate what the future outcome or range of outcomes will likely be. 

What Wisdom Would You Give to Current/Future Economics Majors

Anne Cipperley
Take as much math as you can because it helps you learn how to think through problems and postgraduate programs require a significant math background. Also, find a career that really challenges you and that you really enjoy. It makes life so much more rewarding.