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Sarah Sik

Sarah Sik
Assistant Professor
Art, College of Fine Arts
UFA Warren M. Lee Center for the Fine Arts 106
Phone: 605-677-5733
Bio:
Dr. Sik received her Ph.D. in art history in 2010 from the University of Minnesota. She has taught art history at the University of Minnesota, Hamline University, Penn State, and Bucknell University.
Teaching Interests:
Dr. Sik's teaching interests include the history of fine arts, design, alternative media, aesthetics, and critical theory. Students are particularly strongly encouraged to analyze visual culture in interdisciplinary and multicultural contexts.
Research Interests:
Dr. Sik's primary research emphasis is French and German fine art and design circa 1870-1918. Past publications have included the print piracy of the French graphic artist Maurice Biais, the influence of German nationalism upon the design of Joseph Maria Olbrich, the origins of celebrity culture in French fin-de-siècle print media, and the gendering of 19th-century western art influenced by the art and imagined culture of Japan. Current research projects include the reliance of 19th-century sexologists upon visual and literary culture, the intersection of the occult revival and the French feminist movement in fin-de-siècle France, the graphic art of Louis Legrand, the exhibition group Les Arts Incohérents, and the deco-sculptural work of François-Rupert Carabin.
Education:
  • Ph D, Art History, University of Minnesota, 2010
  • MA, Art History, University of Minnesota, 2006
  • BA, Art History, University of Minnesota, 2004
  • BA, English, University of Minnesota, 2004
Grants:
  • "Sexology, Predation, and Censorship in Modern Art", USD Office of Research and Sponsored Programs and Art Department, (2013 - 2014)
  • Travel Grant, College of Fine Arts, Office of the Dean, (2013 - 2013)
  • Travel Grant, College of Fine Arts, Office of the Dean, (2013 - 2013)
  • Travel Grant, College of Fine Arts, Office of the Dean, (2012 - 2012)
Publications:
  • Sik, S., (2012), "'What Dreams May Come': Envisioning the Witch's Body", Majak Bredell, pp. 8-13.
  • Sik, S., (2012), Review of The Brush and the Pen: Odilon Redon and Literature by Dario Gamboni, Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide , vol. 11, iss. 3.
  • Sik, S., (2012), catalogue entries on Jean-Léon Gérôme and Rosa Bonheur, Snite Museum of Art, distributed by University of Washington Press.
  • Sik, S., (2012), John Scott Bradstreet and the Minneapolis Craftshouse, Style 1900, vol. 25, iss. 2.
  • Sik, S., (2011), "'Those Naughty Little Geishas': The Gendering of Japonisme", Mississippi Museum of Art, distributed by the University of Washington Press, pp. 107-125.
  • Sik, S., (2010), “‘To See the World in a Grain of Sand’: The Influence of Far Eastern Ceramics on the Development of French Art-Pottery", Jason Jacques Gallery.
  • Sik, S., (2008), “Reframing the Modern: National Image and J.M. Olbrich’s Designs for the St. Louis World’s Fair, 1904” , University of Delaware Press, pp. 39-45.
  • Sik, S., (2007), The Birth of Celebrity Culture in the City of Lights: 1890-1900 , University of Minnesota Libraries.
  • Sik, S., (2007), “Pirated Posters: International Print Politics and the Graphic Art of Maurice Biais", Oklahoma City Museum of Art, pp. 110-123.
  • Sik, S., (2006), Review of Evil by Design: The Creation and Marketing of the Femme Fatale by Elizabeth K. Menon, Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide , vol. 6, iss. 1.
  • Sik, S., (2005), Review of the exhibition catalogue The Arts and Crafts Movement in Europe and America, 1880-1920: Design for the Modern World, Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide , vol. 4, iss. 2.
  • Sik, S., (2005), “John Scott Bradstreet: the Minneapolis Crafthouse and the Decorative Arts Revival in the American Northwest", Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide , vol. 4, iss. 1.
Awards and Honors:
  • Nominated for Belbas-Larson Award for Excellence in Teaching, University of South Dakota, 2013
  • Nominated for Belbas-Larson Award for Excellence in Teaching, University of South Dakota, 2014
Presentations:
  • Sik, S. (2013, October). "The Child Has No Clothes: An Historiographic Challenge". Presented at the SDCAA Annual Conference, Dakota State University, Madison, SD.
  • Sik, S. (2013, August). "Appropriate Appropriations". Presented at the Borders and Crossings: The Artist as Explorer, The University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland.
  • Sik, S. (2013, June). "Seeking New Sins: The Erotic Deco-Sculptural Work of François-Rupert Carabin". Presented at the The Historiography of Art Nouveau Panel , Barcelona, Spain.
  • Sik, S. (2012, November). “Appropriate Appropriations". Presented at the Pressing Prints/Pressing Palms: The Entrepreneurial Printmaker, Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO.
  • Sik, S. (2012, October). “Diabolical Disorder: The ‘Degenerate’ Decorative Work of François-Rupert Carabin". Presented at the 2012 South Dakota College Art Association, South Dakota State University, Brookings, SD.
  • Sik, S. (2012, September). gallery talk with Notre Dame undergraduate and graduate art history students regarding curatorial research. Presented at the Breaking the Mold - Mini-Symposium, Notre Dame, IN.
  • Sik, S. (2011). “Purloined Prints: Maurice Biais and the Improbable French Appropriation of German Satire". Presented at the Cultural Appropriations panel at the 99th annual conference of the College Art Association, New York City, NY.
  • Sik, S. (2007, April). “‘An Ever More Individualistic Art of Negation’: Symbolism, Incohérence and the Fracturing Hieroglyph". Presented at the 42nd Annual Graduate Student Seminar, Department of Museum Education, The Art Institute of Chicago , Chicago, IL.
  • Sik, S. (2006, June). “John Bradstreet and the Minneapolis Craftshouse: Towards an International Vernacular". Presented at the The Intersection of Regionalism and Internationalism—A Living Tradition, Minneapolis, MN.
  • Sik, S. (2005, March). “John Scott Bradstreet and American Japonisme at the Minneapolis Crafthouse". Presented at the Revisioning Reality: International Japonisme—The Influence of Japan on the Visual Arts, 1853-2005, New York City, NY.