College of Fine Arts University Art Galleries

Oscar Howe Reproductions

The following Oscar Howe paintings are available in limited, archival quality giclee reproductions through the University Art Galleries at various costs plus shipping.

For more information or to order, contact the Interim Director of the University Art Galleries, Michelle St. Vrain (Michelle.St.Vrain@usd.edu).

Ritual Figure

Ritual Figure
19" x 15"
$124

There is sublimity in the figure who has carried out the ritual of purification in the self-sacrifice ceremony, where part of himself is given to his Wakan Tanka in exchange for an answer to a prayer. Usually the prayer is for mercy, and so, it is understandably of deep religious significance. The reverent, consoled figure is in a relaxed falling position showing the end of a sacred ceremony. The thongs by which he hung suspended from horizontal pole beams are still attached to his hands. The figure as an entity of spatio-temporal religious meaning, created by the peaceful rhythmic atmosphere of religious yellow in varied diagonal tonal patterns, is a visual symbolism of reverence and peace likened to the mental and spiritual attitude of the praying Indian ending his ritual ceremony.

 

Eagle Dancer

Eagle Dancer
25 ¼" x 19 ½"
$150

The dancer in an illusionary bubble with spatial aspects is a personal concept of functional space as an active esthetic element. The agile dancer in a temporal turning position gains momentum and becomes the focal point of all movements in the composition, visually tempering the mode of the dance with the tempo sensated by visual impression. The extended arms of the dancer portray the eagle in flight, with head down to search for prey, and with mouth open to scream. The semblance continues into other movements: The legs are obliquely out-spread like the maneuvering posture of the eagle in flight.

 

Buffalo Dancer

Buffalo Dancer
23" x 19 ½"
$134

In order to understand the topic of the painting, it is necessary to give a short background of the dance. The Sioux Buffalo Dance was a lengthy dance. It had thirty ceremonies and it required thirty days to complete the dance. This was one of the dances which united the bands of the Sioux tribe. Each summer they would come together to hold this medicine men's dance. They used the "circle" for unity; they danced, camped, ate and sat in council in a circle. The Sioux tribe consisted of seven bands, each band slightly different from the others in mannerisms, actions, and speech. 

To keep these major sacred dances the same, and to strengthen the unity of the whole Sioux tribe, was the reason for the annual meetings. The straight line construction is a personal concept of expression to gain individuality. The technique derives from the old quill and beadwork, and from an old Indian belief that a straight line symbolizes unrelenting truth of righteousness. In quill and beadwork design only straight horizontal and vertical lines are employed. My technique tends to emphasize the diagonal lines.

The ideational quality of exact representation of the Indian is stressed to reflect the true identity of man as an intellectual being. A refined conception of man's perceptive qualities is conducive to intellectual insight and the abstraction of true realism--realism meaning beauty in the "ugly."

This painting is traditional in technique but original in composition. The introduction of a painted background is a trend away from the convention of two-dimensional Indian painting. The triangular patterns denote the "three point design" of the Sioux symbols. One point stands for Earth, one for the sky, and one represents the four cardinal points.

The meticulous detail work is observational in purpose: the painting may be seen from a distance for a general impression or it may be observed closely for the study of its parts.

The idea of the painting is to relate foreground with background in composition as well as in meaning of cosmic expression. The rhythmic and orderly patterns in color are expressive of the Indians' poetic and religious concepts of nature. Close harmony with nature is emphasized by formal abstraction as delineated by the solidity of man as he is likened to the solid forms of nature. A ritual yellow is used for the background space. The painting also expresses the time and space concepts of the dance, with its rhythmic relationship by patterns of the third-dimensional movement in space. The detail includes two-dimension as well as three-dimension with contrasts of light and dark areas. So in time each part of the dancer's dress would sway out and away from the body in space. The body movement adds to the rhythmic play of his dress during the ceremonial dance.

The dancer is a medicine man warrior as shown by his warrior breeches with horizontal stripes. The branches relate nature and animal. Sage is used to wipe perspiration from the face. A wavy line on the arms shows mysticism, and the blue line symbolizes peace. The buffalo head and skin symbolize the identity of the medicine man with his totem. The prayer sticks falling from his hand show the completion of the dance. 

 

Cunka Wakan

Cunka Wakan
17 ¾" x 20 ½"
$108

This horse is raising his hooves high in time with the beat of the drum as he participates in the "Horse Dance." Horses did actually seem to dance as they circled without riders or any guidance in this dance. The title of the painting is the Dakota for horse. A literal translation would be "dog god." Before the horse came, the dog was the only domestic animal. The horse was so much larger than the dog that he was almost godlike in comparison.

 

Mythical Bird

Mythical Bird
15" x 20 ½"
$90

The mythical bird is a messenger which appears during Sioux ceremonies. The bird traveled from east to west symbolizing the journey from sunrise to sunset, and from life to death. Utilizing primary colors, the "circle" represents the "hoop of the earth"-the "tree of life." Traditionally, this would have been constructed of sticks or twigs and reference made to the four cardinal points. The image of the bird utilizes aesthetic lines to provide balance to the painting.

 

Sioux Seed Player

Sioux Seed Player
14" x 20"
$84


 

Sioux Elk Game

Sioux Elk Game
18" x 23 ¼"
$128

This is an excellent example of Howe's fully developed "studio style." Howe sold the painting to Herbert Calhoun, Superintendent of the Pierre Indian School, Pierre, SD. Howe was on his way home to the Crow Creek Reservation after graduating from the Santa Fe Indian School.


 

War Dancer

War Dancer
9 ¾" x 11 ½"
$38

This painting has a mobile appearance. Taking from the Sioux skin-painting technique in the use of the plain background of space, the figure dancer is positioned in dark space to affect a feeling of isolated movement in space. The dark background accentuates by the contrasts of light and dark the movement of triangular patterns that objectify the dancing figure.

He is a warrior in battle dress going through his combat movements in rhythm with the dance drum. The linear horizontal stress of patterns gives the illusion of a mobile, fluid in movement and plasticity, suspended in mid-air. The extended parts of his paraphernalia represented time and space of the dance. The subject matter is a dancer with all the parts necessary for the figure; through it appears more or less an abstraction it is a complete figure in action. The figure was objectified through esthetic points. The procedural method of Sioux art tradition composing with esthetic points to objectify ideas, designs, and forms was used here for the painting. There is a tradition in Sioux art where the artist commits to memory esthetic points in a space. These are terminal points of objectifying lines or design lines in an abstraction. The points were essential not only for the beauty of lines but also for objectification. So the points have a multiple purposes in a composition. The sense of totality in expression and the dimensional aspects can be attributed to the use of esthetic points.