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The Center for Teaching and Learning provides faculty with support and resources to help understand the multiple factors involved in constructing an environment conducive to learning for all students. The Universal Design for Learning (UDL) framework was originally developed in the 1990s as a fusion of neuroscience and educational research by Anne Meyer, David H. Rose, and David Gordon.  While initial implementation focused on K-12 education, more recent application has been expanded to the higher education setting.   UDL leverages technology and instructional design to develop a flexible learning environment to meet the educational needs of all students.  Meyer, Rose, and Gordon outlined three principles of their UDL Guideline framework inUniversal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice (2014).

 

  • Provide Multiple Methods of Engagement
  • Provide Multiple Methods of Representation
  • Provide Multiple Methods of Action and Expression

 

Multiple Methods of Engagement

  • Neural Networks: Affective—the why of learning
  • Provides: A variety of ways to stimulate and sustain interest
  • Goal: To create learners who are purposeful and motivated

 

Multiple Methods of Representation

  • Neural Networks: Recognition—the what of learning
  • Provides: A variety of ways to present information and content
  • Goal: To create learners who are resourceful and knowledgeable


Multiple Methods of Action and Expression

  • Neural Networks: Strategic—the how of learning
  • Provides: A variety of ways for students to demonstrate learning
  • Goal: To create learners who are strategic and goal-directed

 

To encourage UDL at the University of South Dakota, the CTL provides support including  (but not limited to):

  • Consultations to help faculty identify opportunities for UDL changes
  • Resources for instructors to further develop a UDL approach to course design
  • Training on UDL implementation and best practices for their classroom